Help Centre

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  1. Where does the wood burner standard apply? 25/05/2018

    Everywhere in New Zealand on properties of less than two hectares.

  2. Our Pyroclassic fire appears to have 'rust-like' dust coming out at the bottom. What is this? 25/05/2018

    The rust dust is probably just the exposed bottom edges of the top valley walls where they meet the cylinder rap rusting a little bit due to moisture passing through the fire from the wood fuel. This is where it tends to collect and is quite normal to see and is nothing to be concerned about.

  3. Why is the Pyroclassic sometimes shown as having a 4kW heat output and sometimes 15kW? 25/05/2018

    The 4kW rating for the Pyroclassic IV comes from the efficiency and emissions testing procedure. This heat output test is a byproduct of other tests and it is acknowledged throughout the industry that this method of testing disadvantages fires with a higher thermal mass.

    In light of this the New Zealand Home Heating Association (NZHHA) established a standalone testing procedure specifically designed to measure the actual kW output of a fire in the laboratory environment. The Pyroclassic IV is only one of a few fires to have been tested with this procedure and the results have confirmed the Pyroclassic IV is capable of providing a genuine 15kW of heat for your home.

    A more accurate way of measuring how well a wood burner will heat you home in the real world is to look at the space heating rating which is usually shown in m2. The higher the area shown the better the fire will be to heat the whole home. The Pyroclassic IV is rated up to 250m2, which is one of the highest ratings of any domestic wood fire.

  4. We have just had a minor gas explosion/back puffing in our Pyroclassic. Why has this happened? 25/05/2018

    This could be caused for the following reasons:

    1. Rake not used to bring hot char forward causing wood to burn at the wrong end. Use the rake as per Operating Instructions.
    2. The Turboslide was not opened after re-loading large, cold logs.
    3. The burning of an explosive substance - battery, aerosol container, etc. DO NOT DO THIS!
    4. There was an insufficient bed of coals to ensure adequate ignition of a fresh fuel load.
    5. Too high moisture content of wood fuel. Split one of your logs in half and use your moisture meter to test the wood. 

    As a point of caution you should never insert a fresh log which is too large or placed in the fire too late to ensure a flaming combustion, doing this will cook the wood fuel on the remaining embers releasing unburnt volatile gases into the combustion chamber which will eventually reach a point of ignition, this can result in a sizable explosion inside the fire chamber and may cause damage to the unit. 

  5. How much does it cost? 25/05/2018

    To download the RRP price list of our Pyroclassic wood fire and accessories, click HERE. 

  6. How do I use my moisture meter? 25/05/2018

    The moisture meter is intended to be used regularly throughout the drying process, from when you first get your wood fuel delivered right through to just before burning it. It will allow you to know exactly what the moisture content of the wood fuel you are using is and it will ensure that if used correctly your new fire will be able to perform well. Poor quality wood fuel is the number one cause of issues with all wood fires and flue systems.

  7. What can I do if my wetback develops a thick coating on it? 25/05/2018

    The wetback can develop a coating of crusty creosote when the wood fuel is not being burnt in the most efficient way. Firewood can play a major role in the performance of a wood fire. The species is part of the picture but the most significant thing is that whatever the type of wood it must be well seasoned and dry. Best performance cannot be achieved without the best fuel.

    So back to the question...

    Burning wood at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black. Over the course of a season, creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the flue) which increases the probability the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard. If a hot fire is built in the stove or fireplace and the air control left wide open, this may allow hot oxygen into the chimney where it comes in contact with the creosote which then ignites—causing a flue fire. 

    The easiest way to clean the flue is by placing a deep baking tray or similar under the base of the flue and sweep the flue down into this. This stops all the debris from falling into the top chamber and requiring vacuuming out. The build-up around the wetback is best removed by hand and the rest can be carefully removed by a vacuum cleaner.

    The wetback can be knocked out of alignment if it is moved when the creosote is being cleaned off. This can cause the constant rise to be knocked out of alignment and can result in water hammer developing in the system so be careful. 

  8. How do I remove the ash from my Pyroclassic? 25/05/2018

    Remove the ash when the fire chamber is relatively cool. Use the Pyroclassic curved shovel to slowly empty the fire chamber. Ash almost always contains some hot ember.

    Never use a vacuum cleaner. Obtain a metal (non-combustible) ash container with a lid. Store outside on concrete or bare ground.

    Pot ash can be great for your garden if your soils are acidic, use only ash from a cooled fire which used good quality wood.

  9. How do I light my first fire? 25/05/2018

    1. Soak the reusable fire starters in methylated spirits. Tip: It is also handy to store the fire-lighters in a glass jar filled with meths.


    2. Slide the Turboslide to the far right or far left position. This opens the air hole inside the door and allows
    air to flow through acting like an old fashioned pair of bellows.


    3. Place DRY kindling and a few small logs lengthways in the front of the fire chamber leaving a clear space
    in front of the air inlet hole.


    4. Place a soaked fire starter just under the kindling at the front of the fire chamber and light it. Try to avoid
    dripping meths on to any surface when doing this as it can discolour some hearth materials.


    5. Close the door.


    6. Once the fire is burning really well and you have a nice bed of hot embers, move the Turboslide to the
    central position (to cover the air inlet hole), this can be done slowly in several stages if preferred.


    7. When opening the door to load more wood, slide the Turboslide to the far left or right open position,
    and continue as in number 6.

  10. My fire isn’t going like it used to and performs like the flue is blocked even after cleaning. What do I do? 25/05/2018

    Remove the front panel by sliding it up. If there’s a white felt material (gasket), remove this and put back front panel.

    Reason for removal: The gasket is present in Pyro models pre 2015. It was initially there to insulate the bolt but we found it restricted airflow as it tore and clogged the primary air intakes causing the fire to be starved of air.

    If the gasket is not there and you are still experiencing these same issues then it is likely to be one of these three reasons:

    1) Use of wet or unseasoned fuel - test your wood with a moisture meter by splitting a log in two and spiking the centre. If wood is above 20% this is not ideal and you should look at getting some drier wood.

    2) Flue height - it could be a case of the flue not getting enough draw so it needs to be extended to create more positive draw. Every house is different, some houses require 600mm, some 1200mm. This depends on roof configuration and external factors like neighbouring buildings, trees, cliffs & wind.

    3) Operation - you may be unintentionally not allowing the cylinder to get hot enough. Leave the Turboslide open for 30-45 minutes on initial start-up and open again for approximately 5-10 minutes after refuelling to ensure the new fuel has ignited and for the cylinder to maintain an optimum temperature.